Lesson 9: Blending

Lesson 9: Blending

Now with a foundation of the various formulations you can make, now you can go deeper into the aesthetics of creating a well-rounded, pleasing blend.

This lesson corresponds with the Blending Chapter in your course manual, pp. 351-375.  

A few things from the chapter and corresponding video to keep in mind:  

  • In this chapter we touch on the difference between making things for your friends/family and setting up a practice to see clients professionally. The truth is at this stage you need to only focus on the making things for yourself and your community part because that’s where you’ll get a strong foundation. If you’ve already got a retail or service business, you’ll no doubt start to begin applying what you’ve learned but make your practice of aromatherapy focused on yourself and those around you. If not, you’ll be missing lots of great learning (and healing) oppurtunities!
  • In this chapter, you’ll encounter different types of blends, specifically Treatment Blends and Perfume Blends. Though you can certainly make a blend that is a bit of both (see Magaret Maury’s idea of the Individual Prescription), practice making both blends as you learn (see Home Play Assignments).

 

Resources:

 

Watch this Study Session with me and Sylla on the Blending Chapter of the Course.

NOTE: We had a weak internet connection when this video was recorded and so the video is blurry for the first 25 minutes. But the audio is great so you’ll still get all the information.

    This study session was recorded live in 2019.

    Watch it in our Facebook Student Forum here.

    Home Play Assignments:

    Complete these exercises to integrate what you’re learning in this lesson. Tell us about it in the comments below.

    • Practice Blending: Whenever you think about a condition (mom mentions her back hurts, you’re starting to feel a sore throat, kid has skinned knee, uncle has bronchitis, cousin has car-related anxiety, etc.), make up a blend in your head. Even if you’re not going to get a chance to make it, you can still build the neural pathways. If you’ve ever wanted to be the kind of person that’s able to say with confidence a starting formula off the top of your head, this is how you do it!
    • Make a Treatment Blend: Pick one of the ideas for practice blends that you come across and actually make it. Pay particular attention to the therapeutics of the oils you’re choosing and why. Then, consider how you can make something that smells pleasing to the person using it and is safe given the oils chosen, the age and condition of the person being it is for, and the application method. Be sure to write this up as a case study.
    • Make a Perfume Blend: Make a blend that just smells good! Consider the balance of the blend with top, middle and base note(s). Then, dilute it in your favorite carrier and wear it to try it out. Don’t forget to write down what you do so you can rereate it if you like it!
    • Make a Blend that is the “Best Version of You”: In the video we mention the idea of maknig a blend that expresses the best version of you. Aromas not only have the power to heal up but also to help us envision a better life. What oils did you choose? How will you use it?
    Lesson 7: Psycho-aromatherapy

    Lesson 7: Psycho-aromatherapy

    Get ready to learn about how essential oils work on the mind.

    This lesson corresponds with the Psycho-aromatherapy Chapter in your course manual, pp. 277-316.  

    A few things from the chapter and corresponding video to keep in mind:  

    • This is great time to review how the olfactory system works. If you need a refresher, check out the Olfaction Healing Guide.
    • You’ll begin to understand more about odors in general, how they work (here’s the key: the molecules MUST be volatile for us to smell them!), and the ways that they effect us both consciously and unconsciously.
    • The effect that an aroma has on an individual is determined by two things:
      • The properties of the odor itself (i.e. stimulant, sedative, etc.).
      • The preferences of the individual (including scent associations via memory).
    • This chapter will also remind you of the role that stress plays in our health and healing. Pay attention to the explanation of the downward spiral vs. the upward spiral. What can you do to encourage an upward spiral and/or counteract a downward one?

     

    Resources:

    • Sylla references a syndrome called ACHOO. Read more here. (Fun fact: Your fellow student, Sarah Collie, knew all about this because her husband was a part of the original study of this phenomenon!).
    • Sylla published a study with her colleague on using essential oils with children with behavorial disorders. Read it here and watch an interview with Dr. Trevor Stokes.

     

    Watch this Study Session with me and Sylla on the Psycho-aromatherapy Chapter of the Course.

      This study session was recorded live in 2019.

      Watch it in our Facebook Student Forum here.

      Home Play Assignments:

      Complete these exercises to integrate what you’re learning in this lesson. Tell us about it in the comments below.

      • Organize your essential oils into their mental effects categories. Get out your essential oils (or if you have alot, start with the 10-20 that you use most often) and place them in groups according to their mental effects. Start with the four catagories of Stimulant, Sedative, Euphoric, and Adaptogen/Regulator. Not sure which one an oil fits into … reference the Aromatherapy Practitioner Reference Manual. Notice if you tend to use oils of one catagory most. If you’re not sure which catagory an oil belongs to, smell it and see how you feel. What do you discover?

      • Make a house blend. If you don’t already have a standard house blend, now is a great time to make one. Consider the other people in your house and their needs and preferences. Over time, this could become the smell of your house that you send with your kids when they move out or ship to your bestie to help them during a hard time.