How to Be An Aromatherapy Educator

How to Be An Aromatherapy Educator

why dilute essential oils

I’ve been an aromatherapy educator since the early 1970s. Since then, the field has undergone many changes. With the introduction of the Internet and multi-level-marketing companies, I’ve seen both good and bad information circulate rapidly.

There’s a lot of potential for misunderstanding when it comes to the power of natural essential oils. This makes quality aromatherapy education more important than ever.

If you’re interested in teaching aromatherapy, here are some tips from a vintage educator.

5 Tips for Becoming an Aromatherapy Educator

1. Know your subject. Study with as many teachers as you can. Absorb different styles, viewpoints, and experiences. Always examine information with a critical eye. Consider the sources and never hesitate to do your own research. As an aromatherapy educator, I work to provide useful, factual, and cited information. But I never mind if a student has questions or does research on their own. In fact, knowing which questions to ask during a live class can provide you with a better education.

2. Apprentice with established institutes. Instead of trying to start from scratch, look for apprenticeships or positions with established teachers. For instance, we sometimes calls on our own students to teach in their areas to increase our educational reach. As these student-teachers improve, they feel more comfortable teaching larger classes and mentoring home-study students. Begin as an apprentice or teaching assistant and work your way up. This can be a great way to establish yourself as an aromatherapy educator.

3. Get comfortable with teaching. Students can often teach you just as much as other educators. Knowing the subject is one thing, but thinking on your feet when students ask unexpected questions is another. Being comfortable in front of a group of people is a skill that needs honing. Teaching can help you discover your own unique educational style.

4. Know how to relax. Being an educator, especially in an unregulated and relatively new field, can be as stressful as it is rewarding. I rely on morning walks, meditation, gardening, or being in nature to relax, center, and energize me. I keep my office and therapy rooms scented with my standby Rosemary and Geranium. I’ve used this aromatherapy blend for 30 years, and it still feels like home to me. Know how to establish a relaxing space and find activities that will help relieve the pressure. Trust me—you’ll need these skills!

5: And remember: teaching is learning. Have a wonderful journey, and enjoy it!

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Member Discounts

As a member of the Atlantic Aromatic Library, you can receive the following discounts on aromatherapy product and services. You must follow the links below and use the specific discount codes to receive discounts.   Our Programs and Products Members of the Atlantic Aromatic Library can receive the following discounts on our products. Your member […]

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Be a Cool Nerd ~ Essential Oil Chemistry & Dr. Tim

Be a Cool Nerd ~ Essential Oil Chemistry & Dr. Tim

Last Sunday, Mom and I got to talking about why essential oil chemistry is something worth learning about. Even when Sylla began studying aromatherapy over 40 years ago, she felt resistant to learn this molecular science. However, once she did, the world of essential oils opened up to her in incredible ways. Though decades behind, I can attest to the same. We both agree there is great value in understanding the chemistry of essential oils.

Here are five reasons why we think every aromatherapist needs to learn essential oil chemistry:

  1. You’ll sound like a NERD … Yeah, we actually think it’s cool to be nerdy when it comes to chemistry. Knowing the chemistry makes you sound smart (who doesn’t want that?). You can pronounce words like cinnamaldehyde and alpha-bisabolol. More than that, you know what they mean and how they contribute to the therapeutic effect or safety concerns of the oil. Plus, being smart also means that research papers and conference presentations make a lot more sense.
  2. It is not as hard as you think. Unlike the organic chemistry class you had in college, essential oil chemistry is primarily concerned with only three elements: carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Just knowing that all the aromas we work with are virtually countless combinations of these three elements still blows our mind!
  3. When you think on the molecular level, you enter a whole new world. This can open doors to other fields of study, perhaps biochemistry or physiology. Then, you start to understand how your own body works, which gives you a deeper understanding of health and healing.
  4. Learning about essential oil chemistry means you’ll be more informed on how to read and understand the components of a new oil or product. You can look up the constituents (Need a resource? Our Aromatherapy Practitioner Reference Manual has a Phytochemical Index) and what the known therapeutic properties of that component are. You’ll also learn how to not fall into the trap of determining effects based solely on major components. A study of essential oil chemistry quickly reveals the nuances of these “potent chemical cocktails,” as Dr. Tim likes to call them.
  5. You’ll learn that the magic of the oils comes from the chemistry. For us, this doesn’t break the spell. It’s just the opposite: understanding the science only enhances the magic.

So, you want to be a nerd? In October, we are hosting Dr. Timothy Miller for AromaChemistry, a fun-filled weekend of nerdalicious learning. Even though we both teach essential oil chemistry in our Beginner’s Course and Practitioner Training, we wanted to host Tim because he’s like no other teacher we’ve ever had.

You can see how Tim and I get along so well.

In Sylla’s words:

“I’ve studied a bit in my 40 years, and Tim Miller stands out as an exceptional teacher. Not only does he have a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience in his field as healer, but his personality shines through when he’s teaching. He brings a fresh new energy that is quite appealing.

When he teaches, I find myself fully engaged by his youthful presence. He has a way of recapping each lesson, relating the previous concepts to the next lesson, and making sure students understand before moving on. Tim is a refreshing new teacher with lots to share.”

Hear Tim speak for himself:

 

Spring Sale – 2 Hours Only!

Spring Sale – 2 Hours Only!

Make sure to enter our Spring Giveaway contest for your chance to win a free book or class. If you win something you already have, we will give to the equivalent in credit towards a book or class.

March 2017

In celebration of our coming out this weekend, we are offering super savings for 2 hours only!

Only from 2-4pm on Sunday, you can get HALF OFF these items.

All orders include free shipping to anywhere in the US.

These materials have NEVER been offered at these prices.

Limited quantities for each sale item. Get yours now and save!

We Are Setting Roots in South Carolina!

We Are Setting Roots in South Carolina!

The Atlantic Institute is growing!

We are happy to announce that we have a new instructor on board. The wonderful and talented Shellie Enteen will now be teaching our classes. Shellie lives in South Carolina but hopes to serve those seeking live classes in the Carolinas and Georgia. Massage therapists may recognize her name from her regular column, The Aromatic Message, in Massage Today. Since 2001, Shellie has contributed over 40 wonderful articles on all aspects of aromatherapy to this publication.

Shellie also hosts a weekly radio show on the Esoterically Speaking Network. On this show, she promotes using essential oils to help cope
with the current energies. She recently interviewed Sylla on her show, and they discussed what is going on in the field of aromatherapy. Check it out here. 


We thought we would put Shellie in the interview seat and ask her a few questions, so you can get to know her a little better.

Atlantic Institute of Aromatherapy: How did you get started using essential oils?

Shellie Enteen: In the mid 1980s, I received an Aromatherapy Full-Body Treatment from a friend who’d studied in England and felt the incredible power of Lavender. Then I was introduced to Pat and Gerri at Nature’s Symphony and started incorporating them in my massage oils.

AIA: What were some of your first favorite ways to use aromatherapy in your daily life?

SE: Back then, I used them mainly for therapeutic results—for myself and for clients.

AIA: What is one of your favorite ways to use essential oils now?

SE: It’s hard to pinpoint one specific way, as these oils are in many aspects of my life now, including cleaning. I am a big advocate of perfumes, room diffusion, and recognizing the subtle aspects for all kinds of therapy.

AIA: Describe a favorite memory from your experience of teaching aromatherapy students.

SE: I have so many wonderful memories from teaching, but one that stands out is when I was in Dallas, TX, giving an Introduction to Aromatherapy class for LMTs. I was talking about Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis). I mentioned in the “subtle” information [part of the class] that it helped relieve anger and that I personally felt that made it a good choice for clients with TMJ clenching. Unbeknownst to me, a student was trying out my theory with the bottle I’d passed around. She started waving her hand, and when I called on her, she revealed that she had been struggling with severe TMJ and the moment she applied a drop of chamomile to her joint area, the muscles immediately let go. It was quite an impressive demonstration for everyone.

AIA: What do you think is most important for new students to know?

SE: Apart from the basics of essential oil properties, methods, and safety issues, I think having a full understanding of the aromatherapy industry and how essences are sourced and created is important for students to be able to make wise choices.