How to Make Spruce Syrup

How to Make Spruce Syrup

Ah, the smell of Evergreens … This is a scent that can transport you to a winter landscape. Even if you live in a tropical place like us, there are ways you can feel like you’re on a mountain overlooking snow-covered trees.

My latest favorite is crystallized Spruce needles and with those, Spruce Syrup!

As part of the Spruce Exploration Deep Dive in the Inner Sanctum Library, I crystallized some real Spruce tips and made a simple syrup with them. (If you don’t have any Spruce trees near you, you can order them from a beer supplier here.) I imagined I was a homesteader or wilderness person, wishing to preserve the feeling of Spruce, the smell of winter into a simple syrup—since I don’t have maple trees to tap. It’s been the best addition to my water.

DIRECTIONS:

A simple syrup is just sugar and water together in a 1:1 ratio. So, I boiled water and added the sugar till it dissolved, as I did for the crystallization project. I immersed the remaining Spruce sprigs, wood, and needles, along with the rest of the sugar mix I had used. Simmering on the stove, I kept it on low so I wouldn’t lose the essential oils. I must say it smelled like something delicious was cooking! After a few hours, I had to add more water as it thickened! So I added more water and left it overnight in the fridge. Then I simmered it again the next day till it smelled perfect and was the right consistency.

Once it cooled, I strained out the spent needles and let it cool further before decanting it into my bottle.

I now use it to flavor and sweeten my daily water glasses.

Watch Sylla share why she loves her Spruce syrup so much.

First, I add some warm water in the bottom of a large tumbler. Then I add about a tablespoon of syrup, mixing it and adding ice. Finally, I top it off with room-temperature distilled water (my choice).

There are many ways to use this simple syrup! It could be used in hot tea. It could also be caramelized till it’s thick and brown—to be drizzled over desserts … The uses are endless.

I already know I should have made more …

Have you ever crystallized an Evergreen? How do you like to use it? Tell us all about it below!

 

How to Be An Aromatherapy Educator

How to Be An Aromatherapy Educator

why dilute essential oils

I’ve been an aromatherapy educator since the early 1970s. Since then, the field has undergone many changes. With the introduction of the Internet and multi-level-marketing companies, I’ve seen both good and bad information circulate rapidly.

There’s a lot of potential for misunderstanding when it comes to the power of natural essential oils. This makes quality aromatherapy education more important than ever.

If you’re interested in teaching aromatherapy, here are some tips from a vintage educator.

5 Tips for Becoming an Aromatherapy Educator

1. Know your subject. Study with as many teachers as you can. Absorb different styles, viewpoints, and experiences. Always examine information with a critical eye. Consider the sources and never hesitate to do your own research. As an aromatherapy educator, I work to provide useful, factual, and cited information. But I never mind if a student has questions or does research on their own. In fact, knowing which questions to ask during a live class can provide you with a better education.

2. Apprentice with established institutes. Instead of trying to start from scratch, look for apprenticeships or positions with established teachers. For instance, we sometimes calls on our own students to teach in their areas to increase our educational reach. As these student-teachers improve, they feel more comfortable teaching larger classes and mentoring home-study students. Begin as an apprentice or teaching assistant and work your way up. This can be a great way to establish yourself as an aromatherapy educator.

3. Get comfortable with teaching. Students can often teach you just as much as other educators. Knowing the subject is one thing, but thinking on your feet when students ask unexpected questions is another. Being comfortable in front of a group of people is a skill that needs honing. Teaching can help you discover your own unique educational style.

4. Know how to relax. Being an educator, especially in an unregulated and relatively new field, can be as stressful as it is rewarding. I rely on morning walks, meditation, gardening, or being in nature to relax, center, and energize me. I keep my office and therapy rooms scented with my standby Rosemary and Geranium. I’ve used this aromatherapy blend for 30 years, and it still feels like home to me. Know how to establish a relaxing space and find activities that will help relieve the pressure. Trust me—you’ll need these skills!

5: And remember: teaching is learning. Have a wonderful journey, and enjoy it!