How to Make Spruce Syrup

How to Make Spruce Syrup

Ah, the smell of Evergreens … This is a scent that can transport you to a winter landscape. Even if you live in a tropical place like us, there are ways you can feel like you’re on a mountain overlooking snow-covered trees.

My latest favorite is crystallized Spruce needles and with those, Spruce Syrup!

As part of the Spruce Exploration Deep Dive in the Inner Sanctum Library, I crystallized some real Spruce tips and made a simple syrup with them. (If you don’t have any Spruce trees near you, you can order them from a beer supplier here.) I imagined I was a homesteader or wilderness person, wishing to preserve the feeling of Spruce, the smell of winter into a simple syrup—since I don’t have maple trees to tap. It’s been the best addition to my water.

DIRECTIONS:

A simple syrup is just sugar and water together in a 1:1 ratio. So, I boiled water and added the sugar till it dissolved, as I did for the crystallization project. I immersed the remaining Spruce sprigs, wood, and needles, along with the rest of the sugar mix I had used. Simmering on the stove, I kept it on low so I wouldn’t lose the essential oils. I must say it smelled like something delicious was cooking! After a few hours, I had to add more water as it thickened! So I added more water and left it overnight in the fridge. Then I simmered it again the next day till it smelled perfect and was the right consistency.

Once it cooled, I strained out the spent needles and let it cool further before decanting it into my bottle.

I now use it to flavor and sweeten my daily water glasses.

Watch Sylla share why she loves her Spruce syrup so much.

First, I add some warm water in the bottom of a large tumbler. Then I add about a tablespoon of syrup, mixing it and adding ice. Finally, I top it off with room-temperature distilled water (my choice).

There are many ways to use this simple syrup! It could be used in hot tea. It could also be caramelized till it’s thick and brown—to be drizzled over desserts … The uses are endless.

I already know I should have made more …

Have you ever crystallized an Evergreen? How do you like to use it? Tell us all about it below!

 

Another Turn of the Year

Another Turn of the Year

Many are celebrating Halloween this week, but we like to remember the more ancient meanings of this holiday. At the Atlantic Institute, we honor those who came before us with knowledge of the cycles of the year.

November 1 marks the halfway point between the Fall Equinox and the Winter Solstice. It is when we descend into the darkest time of the year. Plants start to slow their growth and shed their leaves, preparing their seeds to lie fallow for the winter. What that means is that it is time for quiet reflection and going inward. One may start to look back on the activities of the past year and decide how to best move forward once the light starts to return in a few months.

In this modern world, we don’t necessarily have to follow these patterns like our ancestors. But for most of us, the holiday season keeps us so busy that we have to hold off on many of our projects.

Just like you, we are taking the next few months to make plans for the springtime. We’re thrilled to see the growth of our staff-family, helping to create even better ways to teach you the intuitive science of healing with essential oils.

As Sylla moves closer to retirement and Nyssa continues to build this incredible program her mother created, we are looking for serious students that may one day like to become aromatherapy educators, too.

Read about what it takes to teach aromatherapy and why we need more of you!

We encourage you to reflect on what your heart needs to blossom … Remember that the greatest gift you can give the world is your own self-healing. Let us know how we can help.

Aromatic Reflection

Aromatic Reflection

Winter is the time of year where we’re called to slow down and be still. It might not seem that way with holiday season sprees, year-end deadlines, and new year jump-starts. But it’s very important to continue to find stillness in the whirlwind of winter.

Luckily, our oils are wonderful companions that constantly beckon us to take a moment for ourselves. One of the simplest ways to use essential oils safely is through inhalation. The act of stopping, sitting, smelling, and reflecting can provide just the kind of “time-out” that you need to restore your energy, reset your outlook, and continue.

You’re sitting here reading this blog, so go ahead, grab an oil from the shelf, and try this:

  • Let Go. Relinquish yourself from whatever task is currently at hand, but don’t worry, you’ll get back to it. Just give yourself permission to pause, disengage, and return to your center.
  • Get Comfortable. Sit back in your chair or find a more comfortable seat or position. Maybe lay down on the floor (set an alarm for a few minutes if you’re afraid you’ll fall asleep).
  • Take a Deep Breath. Place a drop of essential oil on a cotton ball, tissue, handkerchief, or inhale from the bottle. Be sure to wave it back and forth while inhaling, alternating nostrils. Perhaps take a few deep breaths this way.
  • Observe. Just watch what happens in your internal world. Can you invite in more relaxation? Are there memories emerging? What emotions do you feel? What does your heart say?

You can write your experience down in a journal or just let it sink in. Continue until you’re ready to return to your to-do list, but do so with a lighter heart and greater awareness.